Archive for October, 2012


In my many temptations,
I will cling to you my sweet Jesus,
In the storms and deep dark seas of life,
I will cling to you my sweet Jesus.

Through my sicknesses and pain,
I will cling to you my sweet Jesus,
Through my anger and shame,
I will cling to you my sweet Jesus.

Through my fears and anguish,
I will cling to you my sweet Jesus,
Through my anxieties and confusion,
I will cling to you my sweet Jesus.

In moments I feel I am losing faith,
I will cling to you my sweet Jesus,
In times of loss and emptiness,
I will cling to you my sweet Jesus.

In my joys and in my sorrows,
I will cling to you my sweet Jesus,
In my life and in my death,
I will cling to you my sweet Jesus.

Julian Tan
Aka Catholicjules

On the Lord’s Prayer

Posted: October 28, 2012 by CatholicJules in Meditations, Memory Book

From a letter to Proba by Saint Augustine, bishop
(Ep. 130, 11,21-12,22; CSEL 44, 63-64)

We need to use words so that we may remind ourselves to consider carefully what we are asking, not so that we may think we can instruct the Lord or prevail upon him.

Thus, when we say: Hallowed be your name, we are reminding ourselves to desire that his name, which in fact is always holy, should also be considered holy among men. I mean that it should not be held in contempt. But this is a help for men, not for God.

And as for our saying: Your kingdom come, it will surely come whether we will it or not. But we are stirring up our desires for the kingdom so that it can come to us and we can deserve to reign there.

When we say: Your will be done on earth as it is in heaven, we are asking him to make us obedient so that his will may be done in us as it is done in heaven by his angels.

When we say: Give us this day our daily bread, in saying this day we mean “in this world.” Here we ask for a sufficiency by specifying the most important part of it; that is, we use the word “bread” to stand for everything. Or else we are asking for the sacrament of the faithful, which is necessary in this world, not to gain temporal happiness but to gain the happiness that is everlasting.

When we say: Forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us, we are reminding ourselves of what we must ask and what we must do in order to be worthy in turn to receive.

When we say: Lead us not into temptation, we are reminding ourselves to ask that his help may not depart from us; otherwise we could be seduced and consent to some temptation, or despair and yield to it.

When we say: Deliver us from evil, we are reminding ourselves to reflect on the fact that we do not yet enjoy the state of blessedness in which we shall suffer no evil. This is the final petition contained in the Lord’s Prayer, and it has a wide application. In this petition the Christian can utter his cries of sorrow, in it he can shed his tears, and through it he can begin, continue and conclude his prayer, whatever the distress in which he finds himself. Yes, it was very appropriate that all these truths should be entrusted to us to remember in these very words.

Whatever be the other words we may prefer to say (words which the one praying chooses so that his disposition may become clearer to himself or which he simply adopts so that his disposition may be intensified), we say nothing that is not contained in the Lord’s Prayer, provided of course we are praying in a correct and proper way. But if anyone says something which is incompatible with this prayer of the Gospel, he is praying in the flesh, even if he is not praying sinfully. And yet I do not know how this could be termed anything but sinful, since those who are born again through the Spirit ought to pray only in the Spirit.

October 28th 2012 – Thirtieth Sunday Ordinary Time

Posted: October 27, 2012 by CatholicJules in Sunday Reflections

Sunday Bible Reflections by Dr. Scott Hahn

Seeing the Son of David

Readings:
Jeremiah 31:7-9
Psalm 126:1-6
Hebrews 5:1-6
Mark 10:46-52

Today’s Gospel turns on an irony—it is a blind man, Bartimaeus, who becomes the first besides the apostles to recognize Jesus as the Messiah. And His healing is the last miracle Jesus performs before entering the holy city of Jerusalem for His last week on earth.

The scene on the road to Jerusalem evokes the joyful procession prophesied by Jeremiah in today’s First Reading. In Jesus this prophecy is fulfilled. God, through the Messiah, is delivering His people from exile, bringing them back from the ends of the earth, with the blind and lame in their midst.

Jesus, as Bartimaeus proclaims, is the long-awaited Son promised to David (see 2 Samuel 7:12-16; Isaiah 11:9; Jeremiah 23:5). Upon His triumphal arrival in Jerusalem, all will see that the everlasting kingdom of David has come (see Mark 11:9-10).

As we hear in today’s Epistle, the Son of David was expected to be the Son of God (see Psalm 2:7). He was to be a priest-king like Melchizedek (see Psalm 110:4), who offered bread and wine to God Most High at the dawn of salvation history (see Genesis 14:18-20).

Bartimaeus is a symbol of his people, the captive Zion which we sing of in today’s Psalm. His God has done great things for him. All his life has been sown in tears and weeping. Now, he reaps a new life.

Bartimaeus, too, should be a sign for us. How often Christ passes us by—in the person of the poor, in the distressing guise of a troublesome family member or burdensome associate (see Matthew 25:31-46)—and yet we don’t see Him.

Christ still calls to us through His Church, as Jesus sent His apostles to call Bartimaeus. Yet how often are we found to be listening instead to the voices of the crowd, not hearing the words of His Church.

Today He asks us what He asks Bartimaeus, “What do you want me to do for you?” Rejoicing, let us ask the same thing of Him—what can we do for all that He has done for us?

Lead Me Home…

Posted: October 25, 2012 by CatholicJules in Personal Thoughts & Reflections

Today’s Gospel Luke 12:49:53

“I came to cast fire upon the earth; and would that it were already kindled! I have a baptism to be baptized with; and how I am constrained until it is accomplished! Do you think that I have come to give peace on earth? No, I tell you, but rather division”

[Personal Reflection]

Do I embrace my Faith in the Gospels abandoning earthly feelings and natural affections? Clinging dearly to my Lord in spite of persecutions, trials and sufferings?

Do I embrace my baptism?

Do I accept that the divine love and charity of our Lord Jesus Christ who came to suffer for us, will often cause division between believers and unbelievers?

If I choose to remain steadfast in my love for Him, in spite of pain, trials and suffering. He, my Lord, my God, my saviour will lead me to the room He has prepared for me in my Father’s house. Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

 

Words I Long To Hear From My Lord….

Posted: October 24, 2012 by CatholicJules in Personal Thoughts & Reflections

Well done, good and faithful servant!

“His master replied, ‘Well done, good and faithful servant! You have been faithful with a few things; I will put you in charge of many things. Come and share your master’s happiness!’ Matt 25:21

Today’s Gospel Luke 12:39-48

  • Blessed is that servant whom his master on arrival finds him taking care of the rest of his charges.

Are we taking care of those who have physical and spiritual needs?

Providing for them….?

Feeding them the Word both in word, action and deed?

  • For those that much is given, much is expected.

Are we doing our part in sharing the love and graces we have received with others? Are we giving our all? Or are we merely doing the little we feel we can spare?

Like St Paul in his letter to the Ephesians 3:2-12, we too have been made servants of the Gospel by a gift of grace from God so that through the Church, we can show how comprehensive God’s wisdom really is, exactly according to the plan which He had had from all eternity in Christ Jesus our Lord.

Let us be bold in proclaiming the Good News, so that we will one day hear the words we long to hear……

 

The Light Of The World

Posted: October 23, 2012 by CatholicJules in Life's Journeys, Personal Thoughts & Reflections

The Light of the World (1853–54) is an allegorical painting by William Holman Hunt representing the figure of Jesus preparing to knock on an overgrown and long-unopened door, illustrating Revelation 3:20: “Behold, I stand at the door and knock; if any man hear My voice, and open the door, I will come in to him, and will sup with him, and he with Me”. According to Hunt: “I painted the picture with what I thought, unworthy though I was, to be by Divine command, and not simply as a good Subject.”[1] The door in the painting has no handle, and can therefore be opened only from the inside, representing “the obstinately shut mind”.

Lk 12:35-38

Jesus said to his disciples:
“Gird your loins and light your lamps
and be like servants who await their master’s return from a wedding,
ready to open immediately when he comes and knocks.
Blessed are those servants
whom the master finds vigilant on his arrival.
Amen, I say to you, he will gird himself,
have them recline at table, and proceed to wait on them.
And should he come in the second or third watch
and find them prepared in this way,
blessed are those servants.”

Personal Reflections

Jesus knocks on our door frequently till one day He will stop. Are we ready to receive Him?

Jesus cannot come into our hearts if we do not open our hearts to Him.  His persistent and pure love for us beckons that we open the door through our own free will.

Blessed are we waiting and ready…….


Sunday Bible Reflections by Dr. Scott Hahn

Cup of Salvation

Readings:
Isaiah 53:10-11
Psalm 33:4-5,18-20,22
Hebrews 4:14-16
Mark 10:35-45

The sons of Zebedee hardly know what they’re asking in today’s Gospel. They are thinking in terms of how the Gentiles rule, of royal privileges and honors.

But the road to Christ’s kingdom is by way of His cross. To share in His glory, we must be willing to drink the cup that He drinks.

The cup is an Old Testament image for God’s judgment. The wicked would be made to drink this cup in punishment for their sins (see Psalm 75:9; Jeremiah 25:15, 28; Isaiah 51:17). But Jesus has come to drink this cup on behalf of all humanity. He has come to be baptized—which means plunged or immersed—into the sufferings we all deserve for our sins (compare Luke 12:50).

In this He will fulfill the task of Isaiah’s suffering servant, whom we read about in today’s First Reading.

Like Isaiah’s servant, the Son of Man will give His life as an offering for sin, as once Israel’s priests offered sacrifices for the sins of the people (see Leviticus 5:17-19).

Jesus is the heavenly high priest of all humanity, as we hear in today’s Epistle. Israel’s high priests offered the blood of goats and calves in the temple sanctuary. But Jesus entered the heavenly sanctuary with His own blood (see Hebrews 9:12).

And by bearing our guilt and offering His life to do the will of God, Jesus ransomed “the many”—paying the price to redeem humanity from spiritual slavery to sin and death.

He has delivered us from death, as we rejoice in today’s Psalm.

We need to hold fast to our confession of faith, as today’s Epistle exhorts us. We must look upon our trials and sufferings as our portion of the cup He promised to those who believe in Him (see Colossians 1:24). We must remember that we have been baptized into His passion and death (see Romans 6:3).

In confidence, let us approach the altar today, the throne of grace, at which we drink the cup of His saving blood (see Mark 14:23-24).